Stepping Into a Rescue or Shelter Worker’s Shoes

March 08, 2018

Stepping Into a Rescue or Shelter Worker’s Shoes

I could never do it! How do you not bring them all home?

 

You’re right, it takes a special kind of person to work with animals and even more so to work in a shelter or rescue environment. Not everyone can do it. These individuals are equipped with special hero-like powers. 

 

People who work in the animal non-profit sector do it for the passion of helping animals. They do not do it for the money or for the bragging rights. Unless of course you count grotesque stories- such as being covered with anal glands- bragging rights. Which, let’s face it, some of these people do!

 

Those who work in this field frequently hear the same kinds of questions:

  • Is it challenging seeing so many animals looking for homes? – Yes.
  • Isn’t it sad work? – Not always. While there are sad moments, there’s also great joy in seeing animals improve and/or get adopted.
  • Don’t you just want to take them all home with you? – No. (There are laws and restrictions against that.)
  • Are these people crazy for doing what they do? – Aren’t we all crazy in our own way?
  • It must be hard euthanizing so many animals. – Of course, but thankfully the euthanasia rate has dropped significantly.

 

Those who work in the non-profit sector are incredibly strong and brave, and I hope they are told so on a daily basis.

 

Shelter and rescue workers can take in the “broken” and injured animals, look past the flaws, and work tirelessly to make the animal feel more comfortable, not caring that they haven’t relieved their bladder in hours and ignoring the rumbling of their own hungry stomachs, because the animal in front of them needs them more.

 

When someone can no longer care for an animal, no matter the reason, it’s the rescue and shelter workers that tie on their super hero capes and jump into the role of the caring friend, soothing the animal and supporting them, whispering sweet nothings in their ears and pulling them close.

 

When an animal is aggressive and scared, ready to bite and lash out, it’s the rescue and shelter workers that stand at the front line, with little to no armor, as they do their best to convince the animal they are safe and the humans around are not trying to hurt it. Try asking a shelter or rescue worker about their battle wounds. You will be in awe over the efforts put forth for an animal that, in that moment, despises them.

 

When an animal needs to be euthanized, and not for lack of space, it’s the rescue and shelter workers that stand with the animal, petting them, soothing them, and feeding them hot dogs, nachos and ice cream, crying over the animal as they pass over the rainbow bridge. They did not pass alone, their paw was held the entire time. And even though that animal didn’t belong to them, the animal still just stole a little piece of their heart and when the worker goes home to put their head on their pillow that night, you better believe the animal will be in their thoughts.  Don’t be surprised if the ink paw prints that decorate their work area or locker are animals from the rescue or shelter that stole a piece of their heart.

 

The reward is seeing these animals come in, no matter the condition, and knowing they got to be a part of the animal’s story. These are the bragging rights.

  • That dog that came in, mistaken for a pile of trash? Those workers shaved off all the mats, cleaned the wounds from the skin pulling too tight, trimmed the nails, fed him, and taught him not all humans will abandon him.
  • That bunny that was a cute present in the Easter basket Sunday morning, but now is an adult and too much responsibly? Rest easy knowing these workers have enough room to love the rabbit until it’s adopted into a new family.
  • That kitten that appeared lifeless that someone brought in to euthanize? That worker took it home daily and treated the panleukopenia, and is now big, healthy, strong, and is being adopted.
  • That dog that was left tied up to a post by the front door? Don’t worry. Shelter and rescue workers run on little sleep, lots of caffeine, and slobber. They wake up early so that animal wasn’t left outside in the cold for long and is now warm with a full belly and plush bed of blankets to rest its head. And that shelter and rescue worker is glad you trusted them enough to care for the pet until a new home is found. No matter if it takes a day or a year.

 

It takes a special kind of person to work in the animal non-profit sector. A super hero. They are not crazy, but have crazy passion about what they do and why they do it.

 

Giving Bark™ wants to work with these shelters and rescues and support them by donating 50% of proceeds to the shelters and rescues, and therefore back to the animals in their care. These donations help the rescues and shelters in helping more animals and providing the care and resources needed to help these animals find a home.

 





Also in News

Benefits of Probiotics in Pets
Benefits of Probiotics in Pets

March 05, 2018

Many pet owners have heard of probiotics, but many do not know whether or not probiotics would benefit their own pets living happily within their homes. So, is there even a point to add a daily supplement, such as a probiotic, into a pet’s daily routine?

Continue Reading

Learn Meowr About Our Products
Learn Meowr About Our Products

December 07, 2017

We want to introduce you to the Giving Bark™ line offered in participating shelters and online. We proudly stand behind our products and have seen them work first hand, which is why we want you to try our products and fall in love with them too!

Continue Reading

Reasons Behind Needing To Rehome A Pet
Reasons Behind Needing To Rehome A Pet

December 07, 2017

Animals make great additions into households and can be found in more and more households each year. Animals are also becoming a significant part of families and are progressively recognized as “fur-babies.”

Continue Reading